Sunday, December 2, 2012

432 Hz compared to 440 Hz

I've been reading about alternate tuning and done some of my own research into the subject. The standard tuning for instruments is A = 440 Hz  This was decided in 1939 and this is the only official standard tuning around the world. My preferred tuning is A = 432 Hz which according to some studies is a more harmonious frequency, in tune with natural law. You can see for yourself with these two water sound images of the two frequencies.


Worth to mention is that there are many alternative frequencies for tuning. Some people say 444 Hz is the "sacred frequency" but so far there is no "right" or "wrong" tuning defined. There are claims that 432 Hz was the standard tuning for classical composers, but this is not true. There was no such thing as a standard tuning before electromagnetism was discovered in the 19th century, which enabled the precise measurement of frequencies. Old organ pipes are tuned to a large variety of frequencies. 

"For example, an English pitchpipe from 1720 plays the A above middle C at 380 Hz, while the organs played by Johann Sebastian Bach in Hamburg, Leipzig and Weimar were pitched at A = 480 Hz, a difference of around four semitones. In other words, the A produced by the 1720 pitchpipe would have been at the same frequency as the F on one of Bach's organs."

With this being said, my own personal experience with the different frequencies has been clear. I feel a lot more relaxed when playing 432 Hz on my guitar, maybe partly because there is less tension on the strings. However, there is also a connection to sacred numbers. An lower octave is half the frequency and a higher octave is double frequency. The A string (second lowest) on a guitar that is the one being tuned is two octaves below the tuning A, which means four times lower frequency. For 440 Hz this becomes 110 Hz, but for 432 Hz it becomes 108 Hz, which is a sacred number. (See Wikipedia)

You can also see a practical experiment I did with some friends on the Solfeggio frequency 528 Hz in this article.

For a more philosophical article, read about the Source of Music.

23 comments:

  1. Thanks Patrik - very interesting article - I am wondering what the impact to tunning to A=432hz makes to when you play other notes and it's impact on the water sound image.

    Ed K

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    1. I'm glad to hear you appreciate the article!
      The other notes you play on a regular instrument wouldn't be exact frequencies - a fifth (the E note) should be 3:2 which is 648 Hz but due to equal temperament the intervals aren't perfect.
      In Gandharva Veda music is always played with just intonation which means all intervals are perfect, but you can't switch keys - you would have to play all songs in A major, as an example.

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  2. p.s. I could not play your samples via internet explorer on my windows 7 pc. Not sure where the problem lies

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    1. I have had some trouble with the music samples... if you have Spotify you should be able to search "Siljestam" and find my music there.
      Otherwise I could email some songs to you if you'd like?
      Just send an email to me at patrik.siljestam@gmail.com

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  3. Hitler (Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels), Rockefellers and the Illuminazi made us change to 440 MHz in 1939 (11th September 1939 to be exact).... Let's change it back to 432 MHz.

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    1. Well, my question to you would then be this: how long did we have 432 Hz?
      (it's not MHz because that would be 432000 Hz which is really really high pitched sound that human ears cannot perceive). Before the 19th century the technology to measure hertz and frequencies didn't even exist, and as far as I know there has never been any documented consensus around 432 Hz.

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    2. If you start the scale at 440hz, you have to work with decimals in the ladder... if you start wit 432hz, you get round numbers at all the tones... isnt that proof enough?
      Loose from the musical aspect, it's mathematically unlogic to start at 440hz. So why did they agree upon 440hz?
      We know for a fact that the nazi's did a tremendous amount of research, around the world, on the spiritual subject. It's also pretty well documented that right after the 2ndWW the standard basetone of 440hz was implemented. Cross reference it with Project Paperclip and the contours of a worldwide scam start to become visible.

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    3. Another thing to consider is that many instruments, such as guitar and piano, are not tuned with perfect intervals in order to play in different keys.

      Also, 440 Hz was an informal standard in the American music industry in 1926. This is 7 years before the Nazi government was elected 1933. There have been many different tuning options: a modern baroque pitch of 415 Hz (currently, A flat), baroque for some special church music (Chorton pitch) at 466 Hz (A sharp) and classical pitch at 432 Hz.

      440 Hz may or may not be a conspiracy, but I think the important thing to focus on is to do more research around sound in general and compare not just 400 Hz to 432 Hz, but compare basically all frequencies to determine their different characteristics.

      There is also the question of just intonation vs equal temperament, which plays maybe an even larger role in the effects of music. You can read more about it here:
      http://www.soundfromtheheart.com/2013/10/pythagorean-tuning-compared-to.html

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  4. Thanks for in-depth information regarding 440 Hz vs. 432 Hz. So even if tuning down so that A equals 432 Hz instead of 440 Hz, other tones on most instruments do not "vibrate with nature" because instruments do not have perfect intervals. I'm wondering if there have been any reasons for standardizing A to 440 Hz?, I mean any positive reasons?

    Of what I've experienced so far, I would also say that when playing/singing/listening to music with A = 432 Hz, it makes me more relaxed compared to A = 440 Hz. Is 432 the most "optimal" tuning for our instruments we have (ordinary piano, guitar, etc.)? I guess it depends on the music we are playing, but would we in general benefit on tuning to 432 Hz?

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    1. I think standardizing to 440 Hz has some positive reasons, such as people from various countries can play with each other with more ease, and that there is a general consensus while still leaving the freedom for any group of people to play with another frequency.

      I also experience 432 Hz as more relaxed, and from what I've seen that frequency creates more harmonious patterns than 440 Hz. However, I sometimes play in 444 Hz as well, which has its own unique vibration. It's more energizing rather than relaxing though.

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  5. I wonder who controls the music industry? And who decides in which tune the musicans must play their music?
    I really wonder is it a magic power behind the vibrations?
    Thanks.

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    1. I don't think any one person or group of people control the music industry. There are music bands that play in alternative tunings, but I think most mainstream musicians don't pay much attention to it and go with the standard 440 Hz.

      The power behind vibrations is not magical - rather scientific. Your body is made of 60 - 70% water and water responds incredibly well to vibrations. As you can see in the water sound images, 440 Hz produces a different pattern than 432 Hz. So it is about how these patterns will influence your physiology, and in extention, your consciousness.

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  6. I know the spiral of silence theory was in Nazi regime after the WWII scientists found out that people were under control and not easy for them to practice the freedom of speech.
    do you think the tune 440 Hz had affected on people?

    Thanks.

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    1. There are theories that 440 Hz was put in place by the Nazi's to make people easier to control. I know of no verification, and to me a Nazi conspiracy is not more likely than people with good intentions deciding on a frequency without considering its impact on humans.

      In other words, I'm not for or against the Nazi theory, but I would like to point out that before then there never was a standard tuning frequency, so there was no change from "good" tuning to "bad" tuning.

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  7. Isn't the internet such a wonderful place for misinformed people to be fooled by conspiracy theories? Good work Patrik and a fair analysis of the A=432Hz vs A440=Hz debate. Interestingly I feel withdrawn and melancholy when listening to "downtuned" music (440 to 432). I actually much prefer going the other way to A=456Hz.

    If you give everyone a pitch control for their music, everyone will choose something different. Everyone's optimal frequencies will be different. Forcing yourself to listen in A=432Hz will be just as "detrimental" as A=440Hz. Find your frequency, be an individual for a change instead of believing the internet.

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    1. I completely agree that 432 Hz is not the only harmonious frequency - the mathematics of vibrations is far too vast of a field to limit itself to one frequency! I personally play both in 432 Hz and 444 Hz. What name you give to the note doesn't really matter that much, having A as a reference point is convenient though.

      I do experience 432 Hz as a more mellow tuning, whereas 444 Hz is more energized. In my mind, there are several frequencies that "hit the spot" and can create beautiful water patterns and so far not enough research has been done on the influence of sound on humans.

      I made a video with friends of C = 528 Hz, which is the C related to A = 444 Hz, that shows beautiful patterns: http://www.soundfromtheheart.com/2013/06/528-hz-experiment.html

      On a regular guitar tuned to A = 444 Hz, C would not equal exactly 528 Hz, however, which is why intervals are so important to consider in this discussion!

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  8. I personally think 444hz = A is the best tuning. I totally agree that 440hz is very plain and "uninspired." I play 432hz = A occasionally, when the song is "sad," e.g. more classical. Most of my songs, which are faster, poppy, rock and blues songs, are played at 444hz. I am curious to see if anyone else plays at 444hz = A?

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    1. I play in both 432 Hz and 444 Hz, depending if I want mellow or upbeat. 440 Hz seems to be a bland middle ground that doesn't have the special harmony of either of the two other.

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  9. Interesting article! I've heard about that discussion before. I think it's possible that nature is somehow 'tuned' to some frequencies, maybe it would have to do with the frequencies of the elements, the orbits of electrons, who knows...

    Now, I don't want to break the spell, but for the sake of science there are some bits of information that should be taken into account:
    In nature, objects and bodies that produce audible sound can be of any size and properties like hardness, density and elasticity. And these dimensions and properties cause objects to produce sound at an infinite range of frequencies. Nature doesn't care about any exact number. As you said, standard tuning is a human thing at any standard, 432 440 or 444.

    So, if you play a certain pitch, some objects around will be 'compatible' (able to vibrate at the same frequency or at an octave, fifth and so on) these objects will vibrate in consonance. That's how sound propagates from one object to other thru the vibration of air. I doubt that a string or clarinet tuned at 432 would necessarily find more 'resonating' objects made by nature that at 440 or any other.

    But how you explain the pictures?

    The surface of the water on the picture, or the patterns that salt draws on a vibrating surface (look for that on youtube) are explained the same way. The patterns we see are due to the size of the plate, or the radius of the surface of water. It is possible to alter sightly the glass dimensions to obtain the same patterns at other frequencies. The surface of the water is not so different than a guitar string, with a given tension, tuning and harmonics. Only it is a plane, not a string, and it's made of different material.

    That said, I don't have enough knowledge to deny any struggle for power and manipulation from 'them' when it comes to standard tuning. I only would not rely on these mind-shaking and impressive pictures as proof of conspiracy.

    I'm a musician, not a scientist.BTW your Blog is fantastic, thank you.

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    1. Thanks for a great comment! And I'm glad you appreciate my articles :)

      I never thought of the fact that a vibrating surface would produce different patterns depending on its own size, and thus different sizes would be in tune with different pitches. I wonder if this is really the case, or if there is some universality to the phenomenon.

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    2. Well, there are lots of small factors to evalluate. For instance, if you create ripples on water (by sound or by throwing a stone at the surface, whatever), these ripples will eventually bounce on the border of that pool and ripple back . The ripples that come back will collide with the ripples that come forth, generate more ripples and so on. Very similar to acoustics. I'm pretty sure of the interaction of dimension, material and pitch. Maybe a test could be done.


      One mind-blowing concept we need to understand is: sound doesn't exist. Unlike light, which is has material existence of its own, sound is just of movement of air or other materials because they were physically hit by something. There's no 'ray of sound' like there is a ray of light.

      Anyway, I do believe that frequencies have some kind of meanings, and a standard tuning of 432 is really different from the 440 standard. I only avoid the temptation of taking false proofs of that - the reason for that must be somewhere else.

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  10. Great read~ I have been interested in this debate ever since two lovely folks from Bhakti Fest 2009 told me to tune my flutes down from 440 to 432. I have ever since! I appreciate your equanimity on the subject. Have you explored the "Equal Temperament" theme? in regards to musical tuning disharmony? Would love to hear your thoughts on that.

    I plan on putting snippets of your articles and others on my own site, I would be honored for a guest blog or a comment! I make end blown pentatonic flutes, culturally Chinese, known as the Xiao, or Shao. My music permeates the yoga communities of the West Coast of the US. www.DragonFlutesRising.com

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    1. Hi Jonathan! I'm glad you enjoy my article!

      I did write about Equal Temperament and Just Intonation, right here: http://www.soundfromtheheart.com/2013/10/pythagorean-tuning-compared-to.html

      You are most welcome to quote my blog, as long as you have a link!

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